WHAT IS GRAPHENE?
WHY ALL THE EXCITEMENT?

GRAPHENE IS THE THINNEST MATERIAL EVER ISOLATED. IT IS A SINGLE SHEET OF CARBON ATOMS ARRANGED IN A HEXAGONAL NETWORK. GRAPHENE’S UNIQUE STRUCTURE GIVES RISE TO A SERIES OF OUTSTANDING PHYSICAL PROPERTIES.
Thinnest

0.345nm or just one carbon atom thick

Strongest

200x stronger than steel at
the same thickness

Most Flexible

Stretches up to 20% of length

Best Barrier

Fully impermeable – even to helium gas

Most Conductive (Electrical)

1 million times more conductive than copper

Most Conductive (THERMal)

5,000 W/mK in all directions (isotropic)

Most Transparent

Absorbs only about 2.3% of visible light

These superlative properties of graphene ensure that graphene products bring disruptive performance improvements when utilised in a range of industrial applications.

Graphene, is a 2D allotrope of carbon which was first isolated and characterised in 2004[1]. Graphene consists of single or few layers of carbon atoms within a sp2 network.  The sp2 network is a hexagonal array of carbon atoms which are capable of stacking to form a lattice. When multiple layers (typically >10) are stacked together the material is considered to be graphite, not graphene.
Graphene exists in two forms as a single-atom thick 2D film or as graphene platelets.  Producing high-purity and high-performing graphene nanoplatelets in commercially useful quantities is a quest which First Graphene has pioneered.
[1] Novoselov KS, Geim AK et al, Science 2004;306(5696):19666–9